Voting in Singapore

General

What is the Elections Department?

Elections Department (ELD) is a department under the Prime Minister’s office. It prepares and manages all elections and any national referendum in Singapore.
Learn more about ELD.

What are the operating hours of Elections Department?

Operating hours are from 9 am to 5.30 pm, Monday to Friday. We are closed on weekends and public holidays.

How do I contact the Elections Department?

You can contact ELD via email or call 1800 225 5353. Alternatively, you may visit our website for more information.

How do we ensure that elections in Singapore are free and fair?

Parliamentary elections in Singapore are governed by the Parliamentary Elections Act. The law provides for a clear and transparent framework which ensures the integrity of the elections.

By way of example, there are equal opportunities for all political participants, regardless of party affiliation, to observe and monitor the election process. After the close of polls, the presiding officer is required to secure the ballot boxes and the Candidates or their agents may affix their own seals. Before vote counting even begins, Candidates and their counting agents are allowed to witness the opening of each ballot box and the taking out of the papers therein. Candidates and their counting agents can also be present during the counting of the votes and raise objections on the validity of any vote.

When is the next election due?

The Parliament has a term of 5 years from its first sitting, but may be dissolved at any time before the expiry of its 5-year term by the President on the advice of the Prime Minister. The general election must be held within 3 months of the dissolution of the Parliament.

The first sitting of the current Parliament was in Jan 2016, and its 5-year term will expire in Jan 2021. Hence, the next general election must be held by Apr 2021, on the assumption that the current Parliament runs its full term.

Why is Internet voting not introduced in Singapore?

ELD has studied the feasibility of Internet voting. Internet voting has various challenges like difficulties in authenticating voters, preventing impersonation and ensuring voting secrecy. In addition, there are system reliability issues and security risks, such as vulnerability to hacking and cyber-attacks.

For now, voting by paper ballot at polling stations is still the surest method of voting to ensure the integrity and secrecy of our voting process.

Is my use of ELD’s digital services and the information I have provided to ELD kept private?

ELD’s digital services are to provide greater convenience to voters, political parties, candidates and their election agents.

ELD only uses the data provided by users for the purpose of processing the transactions.

There is a post asking people not to vote on Polling Day. Is that allowed?

Voting at Singapore's elections is compulsory. It is as much a fundamental right of citizenship as it is a civic responsibility to be exercised by citizens to choose and elect their leaders in a democracy. All qualified electors must vote on Polling Day.

It is an offence for any person who by word, message, writing or in any other manner dissuade or attempt to dissuade another person from giving his vote at the election between nomination and polling day (both days inclusive).

Can I share a mini election survey conducted amongst my personal friends on my Facebook page? Can I do a poll of who my friends had voted for after they have voted, on my Facebook page?

Under the law, the publication of the results of election surveys and exit polls before the close of polls is prohibited.

Voting Eligibility

Am I eligible to vote?

You can vote if your name is in the certified register of electors (RE) for an electoral division (constituency). Your name will be included in the RE before polling day if you are:
  1. A Singapore citizen;
  2. At least 21 years of age;
  3. Not disqualified from being an elector under any prevailing law
  4. (a) Registered Singapore address on NRIC or,
    (b) If residing overseas, has registered a Local Contact Address (LCA).
Learn more about the qualifying criteria.

Why do I need to vote?

Voting is compulsory in Singapore. It is a fundamental right of citizenship and a civic responsibility of citizens to choose and elect their leaders in a democracy. All Singapore citizens whose names are in the Registers of Electors have to cast their votes on Polling Day.

What happens if I don't vote?

If you are unable to vote on Polling Day, your name will be removed from the Registers of Electors after the election. You may apply to restore your name online at Voter Services, using your SingPass, so that you will be eligible to vote in future elections in Singapore.

How do I check if I am eligible to vote?

You may check your eligibility as follows:
  1. Online at the Elections Department website using your SingPass;
  2. At community centres/clubs (with NRIC/passport);
  3. At the Elections Department office, (with NRIC/passport);
  4. Call ELD’s hotline: 1800 225 5353 or
  5. At Singapore overseas missions that serve as overseas polling stations (with NRIC/passport).

Why am I not eligible to vote?

Your voting eligibility is dependent on your citizenship, age and whether you have voted in the last election.

What if I did not vote in the previous election?

If you failed to vote at a previous election:
  1. Your name will be removed from the certified register of electors of the electoral division that you belong to.
  2. You cannot vote at subsequent presidential and parliamentary elections.
You may submit an online application using your SingPass to restore your name to the register. Or you may seek over-the-counter assistance at any community centre/club or the Elections Department. A fee of $50 will be imposed if you do not have a valid reason for not voting. Early application for restoration of name to the Registers of Electors is strongly encouraged. No restoration can be made once a Writ for an election is issued.

Who are non-voters?

Non-voters are Singapore citizens who meet the qualifying criteria, but failed to vote at a previous election. They have also not restored their names to the Registers of Electors.

Can a permanent resident vote?

Permanent residents are not eligible to vote in Singapore.

Voting on Polling Day

What if I will be away on Polling Day?

If you are away on Polling Day, you will not be able to cast your vote. Your name will be removed from the Registers of Electors after the election.

You may apply to restore your name to the registers at our website using your SingPass. Being overseas is regarded as a valid reason for not voting and there will be no administrative fee levied on applications for restoration of names to the registers.

What are the valid reasons for not voting?

Some valid reasons for not voting are:
  1. Working overseas (including being on a business trip) on Polling Day;
  2. Studying overseas at the time of the poll;
  3. Living with your spouse who is working or studying overseas;
  4. Overseas vacation which was planned before the poll; or
  5. Illness or childbirth.
If you are unable to vote on Polling Day, you may submit an online application using your SingPass to restore your name.

What if a voter is physically disabled?

There are special drop-off points near the voting areas at polling stations for vehicles carrying elderly voters or voters with physical disabilities.

Voting areas are barrier-free and wheelchairs are provided for voters who need them. Within the voting area, priority queuing is offered to these voters for the issuance of ballot papers.

At the polling station, Election Officials can help the person mark the ballot paper upon request. All Election Officials are under oath to maintain voting secrecy. Hence, the person’s voting choice will be secret.

What if I am expected to give birth on Polling Day?

There is no voting facility provided at hospitals. Your name will be removed from the registers after the elections, if you are unable to vote on Polling Day.

You may apply to restore your name to the registers at our website using your SingPass.

Hospitalisation is regarded as a valid reason for not voting. There will be no administrative fee levied on applications for restoration of names to the registers.

What happens if a voter has passed away?

The voter’s name will be removed from the Registers of Electors when they are next revised. Family members of the deceased do not need to take any action.

Can a person with a medical condition such as dementia or stroke be exempted from voting?

A person with dementia or stroke is not exempted from voting.

If an eligible voter does not vote on Polling Day, his name will be removed from the register of electors after the election. He may apply to restore his to the registers at our website using his SingPass.

Is there exemption for a voter staying in the hospital or nursing home?

Voting at Singapore’s presidential elections or parliamentary elections is compulsory for all eligible citizens. There is no exemption for a voter staying in the hospital or nursing home and is unable to vote.

If the person does not vote on Polling Day, his name will be removed from the register of electors after the election. He may apply to restore his to the registers at our website using his SingPass.

Can a voter in a drug rehabilitation centre vote?

The voter is not disqualified from voting. However, there is no voting facility provided at the drug rehabilitation centre for him to cast his vote.

If he does not vote on Polling day, his name will be removed from the Registers of Electors after the election. He may apply to restore his name at our website using his SingPass when he is released from the centre. As he has a valid reason for not voting, there will be no administrative fee levied.

Can a voter in prison vote?

There is no voting facility at the prisons for a voter serving a prison sentence to cast his vote.

Hence, his name will be removed from the registers. He may apply to restore his name at our website using his SingPass when he is released from prison. This will be regarded as a valid reason for not voting and there will be no administrative fee levied when he submits his application.

I am hospitalised on Polling Day. Can I vote at the hospital?

There is no voting facility provided at hospitals. Your name will be removed from the registers after Polling Day if you do not vote on Polling Day.

You may apply to restore your name to the registers at our website using your SingPass.

Hospitalisation is regarded as a valid reason for not voting. There will be no administrative fee levied on applications for restoration of names to the registers.

Can I vote on behalf of someone who is unable to travel to the polling station?

If the voter is not able to travel to the polling station to vote, his name will be removed from the Registers of Electors after Polling Day. He may apply to restore his name to the registers when he recovers.

Can I help my relative who is physically disabled to mark his ballot paper?

Voting has to be done by the voter personally at the allotted polling station. This is to maintain voting secrecy.

If the voter is not able to travel to the polling station to vote, his name will be removed from the Registers of Electors after Polling Day.

He may apply to restore his name to the registers when he recovers.

Can the caregiver assisting the voter with disabilities be allowed to join the priority queue?

One caregiver, who must be a valid voter, will be allowed to wait in the priority queue with the voter on wheelchair.

If help is needed with voting, the Election Officials will guide the disabled voter through the entire voting process.

The caregiver will proceed to cast his vote separately from the disabled voter and meet him at the exit.

Can a person who is not eligible to vote at the polling station accompany an elderly voter?

A person who is not eligible to vote at the polling station is not allowed to enter the polling station (area demarcated by green-white tapes) and polling place (area demarcated by red-white tapes). He will have to wait outside the green-white tape.

What kind of help is provided for the elderly and voters with physical disabilities at polling stations?

There are special drop-off points near the voting areas at polling stations for vehicles conveying the elderly and voters with physical disabilities. Voting areas are barrier-free and wheelchairs are provided for voters who need them. Within the voting area, priority queuing is offered to these voters for the issuance of ballot papers. If they are unable to mark the ballot paper themselves may seek assistance from the Election Officials at the polling station. The Election Official will mark the ballot paper in the manner directed by the voter, and they are under oath to keep the choice of the voter secret. Hence, persons with disabilities can vote freely and in secret. The integrity of voting is not compromised.

What kind of help is provided for visually impaired voters at polling stations?

Stencils are provided at polling stations so that they can mark the ballot paper themselves without assistance. The candidates' names are arranged in rows on the ballot paper. The boxes for voters to mark their voting choice are on the right-hand side of each row. The stencils to help blind voters vote independently come with box-shaped cut openings that align with the boxes where voters are to mark their voting choice.

When a blind voter is at the polling place, an Election Official will insert the ballot paper into the stencil and pass it to the blind voter. The Election Official will then, in the presence of polling agents who represent candidates to observe voting proceedings, read out to the blind voter the order of the candidates' names on the ballot paper. The blind voter is then able to mark his voting choice on the ballot paper independently, by feeling the cut openings on the stencil.

Will a voter lose his Pioneer Generation Package/ Merdeka Generation Package benefits if he did not vote?

A voter will not lose his Pioneer Generation/ Merdeka benefits if he did not vote in an election. His name will be removed from the register of electors for failing to vote. He may apply to the Elections Department to apply to restore his name to the registers online at our website using his SingPass. Or he may seek help over-the-counter at any community centre/club or the Elections Department.

Why is the voter required to mark a cross instead of a tick for the candidate he is voting for?

Marking an ‘X’ by voters to indicate their choice of votes is the convention not only here but in many countries such as the United Kingdom and Canada. As this is the practice over the years, our voters know that ‘X’ marks their choice. In view of this, the self-inking pen uses ‘X’ to indicate voters’ choice.

Why is there a voter serial number on my poll card? At the polling station, why does the Election Official write my voter serial number on the counterfoil of the ballot paper and call out my name before I am issued with a ballot paper?

The voter serial number, as the name depicts, is the number assigned to a voter in the relevant Register of Electors. Writing the voter serial number on the ballot paper counterfoil is required by law. This will enable the authority to check that only eligible voters have voted if there is an order from the Court arising from an election petition. (The Court must be satisfied that votes may have been fraudulently cast, thus affecting the result of the election, before issuing the order.)

Calling out the voter’s serial number and name also allows polling agents, who are observing the proceedings, to validate that the voters are listed in their copy of the register.

Is it an offence to use a taxi or private-hire vehicle to travel to a polling station to vote?

No, it is not. Voters can hire or drive a taxi or private-hire vehicle, or be ferried in a private vehicle, to or from a polling station to vote.

However, it is an offence to organise transport to ferry voters to or from a polling station, for the purpose of inducing them to vote at the election.

What happens if ballot papers are lost or destroyed before they are counted?

If ballot papers go missing or are destroyed before they are counted, there are processes to handle such contingencies spelt out in the law, to maintain integrity of election processes.

Fresh polls will be conducted if the number of votes affects the election results. This is when the sum of the total number of affected voters and the total number of overseas voters from the affected electoral division is equal or more than the difference between the votes already counted for the top two candidates. In such a scenario, all voters assigned to the affected polling station will have to re-cast their votes.

Has a ballot box ever been lost or destroyed?

There was no instance at past several elections of lost or damaged ballot boxes prior to them being counted. Consequently, there was no instance of re-polling as a result of loss or destruction of ballot boxes.

Overseas Voting

General

Who can vote overseas?

You can vote overseas at one of the overseas polling station if you:
  1. Are a Singapore citizen living overseas.
  2. Meet the qualifying criteria
  3. Have resided in Singapore for an aggregate of at least 30 days during the 3-year period before the date the current Registers of Electors are based on.
Submit an online application via Voter Services with your SingPass.

Is overseas voting compulsory?

Singaporeans, whose names are in the Registers of Electors (RE) have to cast their vote on Polling Day.

If they are residing overseas, near an overseas polling station, they may register online with their SingPass to vote as an overseas elector.
Learn more about the qualifying criteria for an overseas elector.

What if I am living overseas and I have changed my NRIC address to an overseas address?

If you change your NRIC address to an overseas address, please register a contact address in Singapore with Immigration and Checkpoints Authority of Singapore (ICA). Then your name can be entered or retained in the register of an electoral division when the registers are next revised.

The Registers of Electors are compiled by electoral divisions based on electors’ NRIC addresses. Or, where an NRIC address is overseas, a contact address in Singapore registered with Immigration and Checkpoints Authority of Singapore (ICA).

Learn more about local contact address (LCA). You may also register for an LCA at the same link using your SingPass.

Are overseas votes counted?

All overseas votes are counted. The sealed ballot boxes of marked ballot papers are brought back to Singapore. They are kept in the vault of the Supreme Court.

Can I vote at an overseas polling station if I am on holiday in that country on Polling Day?

You have to be a registered overseas elector to be able to vote at an overseas polling station.
If you are unable to vote in Singapore on Polling Day as you are overseas, your name will be removed from the registers. You can apply to restore your name at Voter Services using your SingPass, so that you can vote at future elections.

How will overseas voting be done? Is it different from how voting is done in Singapore?

The polling procedures at the overseas polling stations will be similar to those in Singapore. The overseas polls are open for 12 hours from 8.00am to 8.00pm at the local time of the respective cities on Polling Day.

Overseas polls must close not later than the close of polls in Singapore, i.e. 8.00pm (Singapore time) on Polling Day.

Hence, polling at overseas polling stations located in the western countries will have to be held one day ahead of the polls in Singapore.

How will I know if my overseas vote has any impact on the election?

If the overseas votes have impact on the outcome:
  1. The Returning Officer will announce the number of votes cast in Singapore in favour of each candidate.
  2. He will defer the declaration of the candidate elected until the day the overseas votes are counted.
  3. After the overseas votes are counted, the final results will be published in the Singapore Government Gazette.
If the overseas votes have no impact on the outcome of the election, the Returning Officer (RO) will declare the candidate to whom the greatest number of votes is given to be elected.

Can we implement postal voting or advance voting for overseas Singaporeans?

In postal voting, there are risks with security and secrecy of the ballot as it may be lost or tampered with during postal delivery. In addition, ballot papers have to be sent to the voters at their registered overseas addresses and they have to mail back the marked ballot papers to the Returning Officer by a certain date. Late votes and missing votes will result in controversies.

In the case of advance voting, by having to vote earlier, Singaporeans may not have sufficient information to form a conclusion on who to vote for.

Does my spouse who is not a Singaporean need to register a local contact address?

As your spouse is not a Singapore citizen, he does not need to register a local contact address. The registration of local contact address is solely for voting purpose.

Registration as an Overseas Voter

I just moved to country X but have not registered myself as an overseas voter. Can I still vote at the overseas polling station?

If you meet the qualifying criteria and wish to vote overseas at the next election, you can submit an online application at the ELD website using your SingPass, to register yourself as an overseas elector. Application for registration as an overseas elector is open all-year round, up to the second day after the Writ for an election is issued.

Details on this and other elections-related procedures can be found in https://www.eld.gov.sg/voters_overseas.html.

Can Singaporeans who are not registered as overseas electors be allowed to vote overseas?

Singaporeans who are not registered as overseas electors will not be able to vote at one of the designated overseas polling stations.

What if I have not registered to vote overseas?

You may register to be an overseas elector online at Voter Services with your SingPass. Please check if you meet the qualifying criteria.

Application for registration as an overseas elector is open all-year-round. Applications will not be processed during the period from the 3rd day after the Writ of Election is issued until Polling Day. If you are back in Singapore on Polling Day, you may proceed to the allotted Polling Station with your NRIC/passport and poll card to cast your vote.

As an overseas elector, how would I know the date and time to cast my vote?

You will know the date and time to cast your vote via:
  1. a poll letter sent to the address in your registration form. It will state:
  2. the names of your electoral division and
  3. the overseas polling station allotted to you,
  4. the polling date and hours for that overseas polling station
  5. an email with the same information will also be sent to you if you have given us an email address
  6. Singapore media
  7. and the Elections Department (ELD) website

Why must I re-register as an overseas elector every now and then?

You need to re-register as an overseas elector when the registers are revised because:
  1. All previous registrations as overseas electors would lapse.
  2. This is to keep the records of overseas electors current.

Can I register to be an overseas elector when an election is announced?

You can register to vote overseas online at Voter Services using your SingPass, if you meet the qualifying criteria.

Registration to be an overseas elector is open throughout the year. Applications will not be processed during the period from the 3rd day after the Writ of Election is issued until the Polling Day.

Can my family member vote on my behalf in Singapore, as I am residing overseas?

You have to vote personally at the allotted polling station. There is no proxy voting in Singapore. This is to maintain voting secrecy.

How would I know if my application to be an overseas elector is successful?

Elections Department (ELD) will inform you of the outcome of your application via email. You will also be informed of the location of your assigned overseas polling station.

You may also login to Voter Services with your SingPass to check your status.

What should I do if I am going to return to Singapore permanently but had earlier registered to be an overseas elector?

Please cancel your registration as an overseas elector online at Voter Services using your SingPass.

Why do I need to stay in Singapore for 30 days when I am working overseas?

This is required under Section 5(1A) of the Parliamentary Elections Act. Learn more about the law. The spirit of the law is to allow overseas voting only for overseas Singaporeans who maintain their links back home. They are expected to return to visit their families and friends for at least 30 days over a three-year period.

Local Contact Address

What is a contact address in Singapore?

The contact address in Singapore is also commonly known as local contact address (LCA). This is a contact address in Singapore that you have registered with ICA Immigration and Checkpoints Authority of Singapore (ICA).

The contact address must either be:
  1. the address of any residential property in Singapore that you own an estate or interest in the residential address in Singapore of: your spouse, grandparent, parent, sibling, child, grandchild;
  2. any grandparent, parent or sibling of your spouse;
  3. any sibling of any of your parents or your spouse's parents; or
  4. any child of any of your siblings or your spouse's siblings.
  5. You can register your LCA online at Voter Services using your SingPass.

If I don't have a contact address in Singapore, can I still register to vote overseas?

If you don’t register a contact address in Singapore with Immigration and Checkpoints Authority of Singapore (ICA), Elections Department (ELD) will not be able to place your name in a Register of Elector.

The registers are compiled by electoral divisions based on electors’ NRIC addresses as of the registers’ cut-off date.

Hence, you will not be able to register to vote overseas.

How can I register a local contact address (LCA)?

You can register your LCA online at Voter Services using your SingPass.

Why do I have to register a local contact address (LCA)?

You have to register a local contact address (LCA) with Immigration and Checkpoints Authority of Singapore (ICA) if you have an overseas address on your NRIC.

This will enable Elections Department (ELD) to enter your name in the Register of Electors of an electoral division.

The registers are compiled by electoral division, based on electors’ NRIC addresses as of the registers’ cut-off date.

When can I register a local contact address (LCA) with Immigration Authority and Checkpoints of Singapore (ICA)?

You can register a local contact address with Immigration and Checkpoints Authority of Singapore (ICA) at any time. However, you are advised to register your local contact address early.

Then, your name can be entered into a register of electors when the current registers are next revised.

When and how will I be informed of the status of my local contact address (LCA) registration?

You will be notified of the status of your local contact address (LCA) depending on whose residential address you are registering.

If you are registering the address of a residential property in Singapore that you own an estate or interest in as your local contact address (LCA), you will be notified of the outcome within seven (7) working days. You may check your status online at Voter Services using your SingPass.

If you are registering the residential address of any family member/relative as your local contact address:
ICA will write to the person concerned by registered mail for confirmation of your relationship with the person, and for the persons’ consent on your use of his address as your LCA.

ICA would need to receive this confirmation within 14 working days, otherwise your application will lapse. ICA will notify you on the outcome upon receipt of confirmation of relationship and consent from the person. You may check your status online at Voter Services using your SingPass.

Can I register my close friend's address as my contact address in Singapore?

You cannot use your close friend’s address as a contact address in Singapore. It does not fulfil the requirements under the law.

Will I receive mail from participating agencies at my overseas address, if I register a local contact address (LCA)?

You will receive mail at your overseas address from participating agencies. The Local contact address (LCA) is solely for Elections Department (ELD) to enter your name into a Register of Electors when revising the current registers.

Will my name be entered into a Register of Electors immediately after my local contact address (LCA) is accepted by the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority (ICA)?

Your name will be entered into a Register of Electors when the registers are next revised.

Thereafter, you may apply to be an overseas elector online using your SingPass.

Is it an offence if I do not wish to register a local contact address (LCA) although I have an overseas address?

Registration of local contact address is optional. If you do not register a local contact address (LCA), your name will not be entered into a Register of Electors. Hence, you will not be eligible to vote in an election in Singapore.

Voting Overseas on Polling Day

If I have misplaced the poll letter, can I still vote at the overseas polling station which I am allotted?

You can still vote at your allotted overseas polling station with your NRIC or passport. Without the poll letter, it may prolong the voting process. The Election Official may need more time to perform necessary checks.

If you do not receive your poll letter or poll card before Polling Day, you may print out your ePoll letter or ePoll card online at Voter Services using your SingPass.

If I happen to be back in Singapore on Polling Day, can I vote in Singapore?

If you are in Singapore on Polling Day, you may vote at the allotted polling station in Singapore.

A poll card informing you of your allotted polling station in Singapore will also be mailed to your latest Singapore contact address registered with ICA.

If you do not receive your poll card before Polling Day, you may print out your ePoll card online at Voter Services using your SingPass.

You may also seek over-the-counter assistance at a community centre/club or the Elections Department (ELD) to print out the ePoll card.

Overseas Polling Stations

What if there is no overseas polling station near my overseas address?

If there is no polling station in the country where you are residing, you will only be able to vote in Singapore.

In the event that you are unable to return home to vote:
Your name will be removed from the Registers of Electors after Polling Day. You may apply to restore your name to the register online at Voter Services using your SingPass.

Will the Elections Department consider setting up more overseas polling stations so that overseas Singaporeans do not have to forfeit his/her right to vote?

We currently have 10 overseas polling stations including in cities such as Beijing, Canberra, Hong Kong, Tokyo, London and New York.

The selection of overseas polling stations takes into account several factors. First, there should be a significant number of Singaporeans living in that city and country. Second, the city must have Singapore Government managed facilities which enable our officials to exercise control to ensure that the voting process is carried out in a proper and orderly manner to ensure the integrity of the process. Third, in order to ensure that we are able to optimise our limited resources, the city or country should not be so nearby that Singaporeans can travel back to Singapore to vote on polling day with relative ease.

We will review the list of overseas polling stations regularly.

SingPass

If I do not have a SingPass account, how can I register to vote overseas?

If you do not have a SingPass account, you may register at the SingPass website. With the SingPass account, you can log in to Elections Department (ELD) Voter Services to register as an overseas elector.

If I have forgotten my SingPass password, what should I do?

If you have already set up 2-Step Verification (2FA), you can reset your SingPass password online. If you have not set up 2FA, you can follow the instructions at the SingPass website to request for your SingPass password to be mailed to your registered NRIC address. Please see details on resetting of SingPass password at the SingPass website.

What should I do if I have not received my SingPass password in the mail?

The password and token will be sent to your registered overseas address within 10 working days. This is subject to postal operator delays. If you do not receive it, you may wish to contact the SingPass Helpdesk: +65 6643 0555 or support@singpass.gov.sg.

Why do Voter Services allow login via date of issue of NRIC when there is already login via SingPass?

ELD provides Voter Services for users to check whether a particular NRIC number is found in the Registers of Electors, which determines one's eligibility to vote at elections. This check is done via SingPass.

For voters' convenience, we also allow checks if the user has the 'Date of Issue" of the NRIC. However, to protect voter data confidentiality, when "Date of Issue" is used for the check, only the electoral division and polling district will be shown. In addition, such checks are disabled after the NRIC holder has used SingPass to log into Voter Services.

To prevent other users from checking your electoral division and polling district, you may login to the Voter Services via SingPass to disable future checks using 'Date of Issue'.

Registers of Electors

General

What is a Register of Electors?

A Register of Electors is a list of all qualified electors belonging to an electoral division (also known as constituency). There is one Register for each electoral division. Electoral divisions are areas within Singapore demarcated for the purpose of elections. There are 2 types of electoral divisions in Singapore and they are the Group Representation Constituencies (GRCs) and Single Member Constituencies (SMCs). The Registers of Electors are prepared based on the electoral divisions.

The Registers of Electors are compiled from records of NRIC holders kept by the Commissioner of National Registration by applying the qualifying criteria for voter eligibility as of a prescribed date in accordance with section 5 of the Parliamentary Elections Act (Cap. 218). The date that the current set of Registers is based on (i.e. the cut-off date) is 1 Mar 2020.

What are the qualifying criteria for a name to be in the Registers of Electors (i.e. can vote in this election)? Can permanent residents vote? How is voting eligibility for this election determined?

Any person who satisfies the following qualifying criteria as of the cut-off date for the Registers of Electors will be entitled to have his name included in the Register of Electors for an electoral division (also known as constituency) corresponding to his address:
  1. is a citizen of Singapore (holder of pink NRIC);
  2. is not less than 21 years of age;
  3. is not disqualified from being an elector under any prevailing law; and
  4. (i) has a Singapore residential address on his NRIC; or
    (ii) if he is residing overseas, and has changed his NRIC address to an overseas address, has a contact address in Singapore (also known as a Local Contact Address (LCA) registered with the Immigration & Checkpoints Authority).
There is no need to apply to be included in the Registers.

The list of voters for this election is based on the Registers of Electors prepared on 1 Mar 2020. Singaporeans who turned 21 years of age after 1 Mar 2020 will not be in the Registers.

What information do the Registers of Electors contain?

The Registers of Electors contain the following information on electors:
  1. Name of elector
  2. Gender
  3. NRIC number^
  4. Address (i.e. NRIC address or local contact address for overseas Singaporeans)
  5. Electoral division (i.e. constituency)
  6. Polling district (which is a sub-division of the electoral division)
  7. Serial number of elector (i.e. the unique number for each elector in a polling district of the electoral division)
^Partial NRIC number (e.g. XXXXX123A) is shown in sales copies to better safeguard electors’ personal information in the registers.

What happens if a voter has passed away?

The voter’s name will be removed from the Registers of Electors when they are next revised. Family members of the deceased do not need to take any action.

I am holding a valid NRIC and I think I am qualified to vote so why I cannot find my name in the Registers?

Such scenario is likely to happen if you have recently acquired Singapore citizenship or turned 21 years of age after the cut-off date for the Registers of Electors. Your name will only be included in the Registers when they are next revised. You will be eligible to vote in future elections.

I am a Singapore citizen residing overseas and my name is not in the Registers of Electors as I have changed my NRIC address to an overseas address after the cut-off date of the current Registers of Electors. Will my name be entered to the Registers upon registering a local contact address?

If your local contact address (LCA) is registered with the Immigration & Checkpoints Authority after the cut-off date, your name will be entered into the registers when they are next revised.

For voting purposes, you are strongly encouraged to register your local contact address (LCA) with the Immigration & Checkpoints Authority as soon as you have reported an overseas address as your NRIC address.

Claims & Objections

During the 2-week public inspection period of the revised Registers, what should I do if I find discrepancies in my particulars in the revised Registers?

During the inspection period, a person may submit a claim to: (i) include his name in the Registers of Electors (if he considers himself an eligible elector but his name has been omitted); or (ii) update his particulars (i.e. name and NRIC address) in the Registers if his particulars in the Registers are reflected differently from his NRIC.

The law allows claims for change of address even after the cut-off date. However, the new residential address must first be registered with the Immigration & Checkpoints Authority and then a claim must be submitted to the Registration Officer, anytime during and up to the close of the inspection of the revised Registers.

If the new residential address is in another electoral division (also known as constituency), your name will be moved to that Register (i.e. the Register for the electoral division where your new residential address is).

Non-Voters

Who are non-voters?
How does a non-voter apply to be in the Registers of Electors?

Non-voters are those who failed to cast their votes and at the end of the election, had their names removed from the Register of Electors.

To vote in the next election, a non-voter may apply to restore his name using his SingPass at ELD website (https://www.eld.gov.sg/online.html).

If he has a valid reason for not voting, ELD will restore his name to the Register free of charge. Otherwise, an administrative fee of $50.00 will be levied.

Application for restoration of name to the Registers of Electors should be done early as no restoration can be made once a Writ for an election is issued. If a non-voter has not restored his name to the Register, he cannot vote in future elections, and is also disqualified from being a candidate.

What would be regarded as an acceptable reason for not voting?
Do I need to pay an administrative fee in order to restore my name?

Some examples of acceptable reasons for not voting are:
  1. Residing overseas;
  2. Overseas for work, studies, vacation, etc.;
  3. Medical reasons.
If you have a valid reason for not voting, ELD will restore your name to the Registers free of charge. Otherwise, an administrative fee of $50.00 will be levied.

There is no need to enclose documentary proof at the point of submitting the application. These supporting documents will only be needed upon request by ELD.

My wife is expected to give birth on Polling Day. What happens if she is unable to vote? Can warded patients in hospitals choose to vote at the hospitals?

As there is no voting facility provided at hospitals, voters who are hospitalised and are unable to vote will have their names removed from the Registers.

You may apply to restore your name at ELD website (https://www.eld.gov.sg/online.html) using SingPass so that you can vote at future elections. As hospitalisation is regarded as a valid reason for not voting, there will be no administrative fee levied when you submit your application.

Application for restoration of name to the Registers of Electors should be done early as no restoration can be made once a Writ for an election is issued.

What if I fail to vote at an election as I was overseas on holiday, away on a business trip, etc.?

If you are unable to vote on Polling Day as you are overseas, your name will be removed from the Registers. You may apply to restore your name at ELD website (https://www.eld.gov.sg/online.html) using your SingPass so that you can vote at future elections. As you have a valid reason for not voting, there will be no administrative fee levied when you submit your application.

Application for restoration of name to the Registers of Electors should be done early as no restoration can be made once a Writ for an election is issued.

Can I apply for restoration of my name to the Registers of Electors now so that I can vote at the coming election?

You are strongly encouraged to have your name restored at the earliest opportunity. This will ensure that you can exercise your vote at an election. You may wish to know that once a Writ of Election is issued, you will not be able to restore your name until after Nomination Day (if the election is not contested) or after Polling Day (if the election is contested).

The current Registers of Electors are compiled by electoral divisions (also known as constituencies) based on electors’ addresses as of 1 Mar 2020. If you changed your address after that date, your new address will be reflected in the Registers only when the Registers are next updated. Hence, if an election is called before the Registers are updated, you will be allocated to vote at a polling station in the electoral division where your previous address comes under.

Do I need to show proof why I did not vote?

The Elections Department usually does not ask for proof to support the reason given. If asked, you may provide 1 of the following relevant document.
  1. An employer’s letter or educational institution’s letter or marriage certificate, if you are overseas for work, study or accompanying spouse.
  2. Documents showing that the trip had been planned before Nomination Day, if you are overseas for vacation or for business. E.g receipt from travel agent/hotel, air ticket, or a letter from your employer.
  3. A medical certificate, hospital bill or the child’s birth certificate in the case of health reasons.

Purchase of Registers of Electors

Why are political parties, election candidates and election agents allowed to purchase and use information in the Registers of Electors?

The law allows political parties, election candidates and their election agents to use the information recorded in the Registers of Electors (e.g. elector’s name and address) to communicate with electors. They cannot use the information for commercial or other purposes.

When using the information in the Registers of Electors, they must also comply with the provisions under the Personal Data Protection Act (PDPA). Please see details in the Advisory Guidelines on Application of PDPA to Election Activities published by the Personal Data Protection Commission.

Can political parties, election candidates and election agents disclose information in the Registers of Electors to other persons?

Political parties, election candidates and election agents can disclose the information to another person only after having obtained a written acknowledgement from the other person that he will not use the information for commercial purposes and will confine its use to communicating with electors.

In addition, they must comply with the provisions under the Personal Data Protection Act (PDPA). Please see details in the Advisory Guidelines on Application of PDPA to Election Activities published by the Personal Data Protection Commission.

Other than political parties, election candidates and their election agents, who else can purchase a copy of the Registers of Electors?

Only political parties, election candidates and their election agents can purchase a copy of the Registers of Electors for use to communicate with electors.